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All About The Armani Tie
Home Shopping Product Reviews
By: Michael Zhu Email Article
Word Count: 548 Digg it | Del.icio.us it | Google it | StumbleUpon it

  

A necktie, more often simply referred to as a tie, is a long piece of fabric worn around the neck. There are many different sizes and styles of ties, with some of the more popular being the bow tie, bolo tie, and ascot tie. Traditionally, ties are worn by men, however, some styles have also been seen on women-especially as part of a school or work uniform. The Armani tie range has always been a fashion hit.

The necktie, as we know it today, was born during the Industrial Revolution-when huge revolutions and growths were made in the manufacturing industry, especially in the textile and garment segment. Men were looking for something easier to put on and wear throughout the day. These first ties were long, thin, and easy to put on and take off.

Over time, the lengths, widths, and patterns of ties has changed with the arrival of different fashion trends in the men's garment industry. The 1940s especially saw the use of bolder colors and more bold patterns that are still seen in ties to this day. Today's ties are a bit wider than those seen in the 1960s and are much more colorful.

Neckties today come in a huge range of patterns and materials. The more popular patterns include stripes and polka dots. There are also a huge range of other, more unique, designs that can be found on ties. These designs include company logos, sports images, cartoon characters, television shows, movies, and much more-the sky really is the limit for the designs and patterns which show up on ties.

The perennial favorite, however, is likely the solid colored tie. While they come in every color of the rainbow, many men own at least a few classic black, gray, or dark brown ties. As many men wear ties day to day when they go to work, many own a collection of ties, with one to suit whatever look they desire or match any suit or outfit that they are wearing.

There are four main types of knots commonly used to tie neckties. These are the half- Windsor knot, the Windsor knot, the four-in-hand knot and finally, the Pratt knot ( known as Shelby), . Because of its simplicity, the four-in-hand knot is likely the most common, although the half- Windsor knot is commonly worn as well.

Ties can be manufactured from a variety of materials and material blends. The most typical fabrics used in ties are polyester and silk. In the past, materials such as wool, rayon, and microfiber were popular, but have fallen out of favor by most manufacturers. The most commonly seen type of tie is the four-in-hand, not to be confused with the knot style, as they are simple, lie flat, and are the easiest for manufacturers to make.

From casual attire to formal wear, the Armani tie is a huge part of a real man's wardrobe. With the vast array of patterns and designs available, there is most definitely something to fit every taste and occasion. It does seem as if neckties as a form of fashion are going anywhere any time soon.

Michael Zhu is an expert author. He has written many articles in various Designer Ties like Giorgio Armani Ties Gucci Ties. For more information about Paul Smith Ties, please contact with us.

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