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Wet Rooms - The Newest Trend in Bathroom Design
Home Home Home Improvement
By: Mary Morris Email Article
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Have you noticed the recent wet room design trend? Wet rooms as extremely stylish and can add a contemporary feel to your home. According to Kitchen and Bath Design News magazine, the formal definition of a wet room is "a bathroom in which the shower is open or set behind a single wall, its floor area being flush with the floor of the rest of the room and the water draining away through an outlet set into the floor." Wet rooms can be created from both small and large bathrooms, downstairs bathrooms, or as part of a master suite.

Perhaps, a couple of reasons why the wet room has been gaining recent popularity is due to the sought-after spa like bathroom experience. Wet rooms convey luxury with their clean lines and minimal design. They also allow the free standing tubs with the chance to steal the show.

While many wet rooms have recently been found in luxury and larger bathrooms, they previously started out in lower budget and institutional settings. Over recent years, free standing tubs have become a staple in bathroom design and can perfectly complement a wet room. Free standing tubs are often complemented by floor-mounted tub fillers. These might invite some extra splashes and spillage. While this could cause concern, wet rooms have been professionally waterproofed to avoid any possible leaks leading to water damage.

One of the main challenges associated with wet rooms is figuring out an efficient way to keep certain items dry, including towels and toilet paper. One way to keep water from going everywhere is to install a frameless shower screen placed in front or to the sides of the shower. This allows the room to still feel open, while being able to keep some key areas dry. Another way to keep your wet room dry is by adding under floor heating. Adding under floor heating to your wet room is highly recommended. Not only does it mean that you will have a nice, warm floor to stand on, any standing water from showering will evaporate much quicker.

When planning any wet room, it is imperative to choose non-porous and slip resistant water-friendly materials. A couple of suitable materials include ceramic and porcelain. Choosing slate, marble, and limestone may not be the best choice since they are porous and would require sealing every few months to prevent water damage.

*Bonus: Although it may be expensive, a great way to create a luxurious feeling is by installing the same materials throughout the floor and run it to the ceiling.


While wet rooms can be a beautiful addition to any home, having the shower and bathtub in the same space may be a personal preference and may affect resale. If you are considering a wet room, or a bathroom remodel, please consult with a trusted contractor first. Balducci Additions and Remodeling is a well-known contractor and has been serving the metro Richmond area for over 30 years. Please contact us to schedule a free estimate.

Mary Morris, Office Assistant for Balducci Additions and Remodeling

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http://www.articlebiz.com/article/1051641984-1-wet-rooms-the-newest-trend-in-bathroom-design/

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