ArticleBiz.com :: Free article content
Authors: Maximum article exposure. Publishers: Reprintable article content.
BROWSE ARTICLES
ArticleBiz.com Home
Featured Articles
Recently Added Articles
Most Viewed Articles
Article Comments
Advanced Article Search
AUTHORS
Submit Article
Check Article Status
Author TOS
PUBLISHERS
RSS Article Feeds
Terms of Service

A Look At Atkins OWL Phase
Home Health & Fitness Weight-Loss
By: Jackie Serta Email Article
Word Count: 719 Digg it | Del.icio.us it | Google it | StumbleUpon it

  

The second phase of the Atkins diet is called Ongoing Weight Loss or OWL. After the rapid weight loss of the 2-week Induction phase, you'll be slowing your weight loss down just a bit. You'll add in specific carbohydrates that will make your diet a little easier and your weight loss just a bit slower. However, you will continue to lose weight at a steady even pace with ease.

During the OWL phase you will boost your body's ability to burn fats. Although you'll be adding carbohydrates slowly, you'll still remain in the state of ketosis. You will continue to use your excess fat as fuel for your body, and the pounds and inches will continue to come off.

The OWL phase will also teach you to make better carbohydrate choices. The recipes and guidelines for OWL will increase your knowledge about nutritious food. You'll replace the poor carbohydrate choices that you relied on in the past with new and better choices.

You'll also learn how many carbohydrates you can consume and still lose weight. The process of the OWL phase is an experiment in what your specific body does with carbs. During the OWL phase, you'll gradually increase your daily carb intake from the 20-gram level that you used in induction. Each week you'll try adding another 5 grams of carbs and then take note of what happens. When weight loss slows too much, you'll know that you've exceeded your personal carb limit.

OWL also prepares you for your permanent weight management program (called maintenance). The habits and practices that you develop during OWL will go a long way toward your long-term success. Treat this period of your diet as training for the real "test" - your post diet life.

During the OWL phase, you'll still be getting most of your carbohydrates from vegetables (just as you do during Induction). It's important to continue to eat a wide variety of vegetables, as they are good for your overall health and good for maintaining intestinal health during the Atkins diet. You will be able to add more portions of vegetables, and then gradually be able to add nuts, seeds and even berries. However, the main focus of the diet will still be protein.

In a way, the Induction phase is easier than any of the other phases of Atkins. The strict plan always works and always produces weight loss. As you enter the OWL phases, you'll need to be more mindful of your carbohydrate count and keep better track of your weight. You'll have more choice and that may lead to more temptations, which could result in a stalling of your weight loss or even weight gain.

Counting carbohydrate grams is critical in your OWL success. If you don't count, you will end up consuming more carbohydrates than you should. However, there are many tools available that can help you with counting. There are several handy, portable books that will tell you the number of grams of carbohydrates in certain foods. Over time, you'll know the "carb count" for your favorite foods instantly.

Page 1 of 2 :: First | Last :: Prev | 1 2 | Next

Information on obesity statistics can be found at Obesity Facts.

Article Source:
http://www.articlebiz.com/article/225541-1-a-look-at-atkins-owl-phase/

This article has been viewed 635 times.

Rate Article
Rating: 0 / 5 stars - 0 vote(s).

Article Comments
There are no comments for this article.

Leave A Reply
 Your Name
 Your Email Address [will not be published]
 Your Website [optional]
 What is eight + three? [tell us you're human]
Notify me of followup comments via email


Related Articles


Copyright © 2019 by ArticleBiz.com. All rights reserved.

Terms of Service | Privacy Policy | Contact Us | Submit Article | Editorial