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Having an Asthma Treatment Plan Means Being Prepared
Home Health & Fitness Medicine
By: Abigail Franks Email Article
Word Count: 459 Digg it | Del.icio.us it | Google it | StumbleUpon it

  

There are certain important factors to consider when developing an asthma treatment plan. None of those factors are more important than having the medications on hand when you need them. Nothing is more alarming when away from home than to realize the drugs needed to end an asthma attack are safely back at home on the kitchen counter.

With the recent advancements in medications and knowledge concerning asthma over the last few decades, many people have become comfortable living with the illness. This no doubt is caused by having an effective asthma treatment plan that has limited the number and severity of the attacks.

At this point, it may be almost second nature to assume that an asthma attack will not happen. This is a dangerous assumption especially when the person with asthma is a young child. He simply never know when they may come in contact with something in the environment that may cause an attack.

The statement that you didn't think that they would need their medicine rings hollow at best while your son or daughter is gasping for air. Children count on us to be proactive with their care and this is especially true if they are suffering from asthma.

It's important to keep your doctor updated on the effects of living with asthma and how effective the current asthma treatment program is working. Issues such as the severity of the attacks is important to determine if the treatment plan needs adjusted.

Another important consideration is the number and duration of attacks experienced. Try to keep a journal or log that will explain the details of each attack. These details should include

1. Duration of the attack. How long would you estimate the asthma attack to have lasted. Was the attack minutes, seconds, etc.

2. Severity of the attack. How difficult was the attack on the asthma patient. I realize this is subjective but a severe attack is different than one that starts and is quickly controlled using available medicines, etc.

3. Treatment. What if anything was done to address the asthma attack? What actions were taken to control the situation? This can be important in fine tuning a treatment plan.

4. Causation. Was there any specific trigger that might have brought on an attack? It may not be clear but details may give some indication of the cause. A cold and windy day may bring on an asthma attack.

Having this information at your next doctor's appointment will go a long way in determining if the asthma treatment program currently being used, is effective or needs to be adjusted. It's only by having consistent information and feedback can your doctor fine tune your personal asthma treatment plan.

Abigail Franks has done extensive research into Asthma,Allergies, and their triggers. Visit the Asthma site for more information on Asthma Treatments and Asthma Triggers

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